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PSHE


“…learning through which children and young people acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to manage their lives, now and in the future.’

PSHE Association

At Snaresbrook Primary School, our aim is that all children have the skills they need to grow up as individuals who are physically and emotionally healthy, and who can make informed decisions about their lives. We help children to see how they relate to others in order to forge and maintain positive relationships. Relationships and Sex Education should form a key part of this, as should learning about physical, mental and emotional health, all within a dedicated space for Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education in the school timetable.

Through Snaresbrook Primary School’s ethos of Core Values Education, we hope to continually develop our character to become the best version of ourselves, developing an understanding and tolerance of each other through knowledge and mutual respect. We recognise and instil in our children the importance of responsibility; to themselves, to peers and ultimately as citizens in the wider world.

High quality PSHE has significant academic and pastoral potential. It helps children prepare for life, and to both know and value who they are and develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to thrive as individuals, family members and members of society in a rapidly changing and challenging world.

How is PSHE implemented?


Snaresbrook Primary School use the ‘Jigsaw’ Scheme of Work; a mindful approach to PSHE, fully fitting with our school ethos ‘Health and well-being are at the heart of our happy school.’ It delivers a comprehensive PSHE Scheme of Learning which allows children to focus on “the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life” and as such, supports Snaresbrook Primary School’s aim for PSHE: that all children have the skills they need to grow up as individuals who are physically and emotionally healthy, and who can make informed decisions about their lives.

Relationships is a key thread within Jigsaw PSHE. The starting point is nurturing a positive relationship with self to grow a sense of identity and self-esteem within individuals. Children learn about rights and responsibilities to themselves and others, developing a high degree of empathy and social skills.

Jigsaw’s units of work are called Puzzle Pieces. In the Puzzle Pieces ‘Being Me in my World’ and ‘Dreams and Goals’, children focus on their attitudes towards learning, motivation and resilience. The ‘Celebrating Difference’ Puzzle Piece explores differences across the spectrum of global society, prejudice and discrimination, acceptance and understanding. Anti-bullying is also a core focus in this particular unit.

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Snaresbrook PSHE Curriculum


All year groups follow the six Jigsaw puzzles below, each puzzle containing the six lessons (or Jigsaw pieces) to make it complete:

PSHE Websites for Home Learning


Jigsaw PSHE

Our chosen scheme of work, that supports a mindful approach to PSHE.

Dialogue Works An excellent website promoting talk and philosophical enquiry in children. Scroll down to the bottom of this page, to access ‘Hometalk’, an easy to use resource requiring no preparation, which promotes and facilitates conversation with children about a variety of topics including Love, Time, Difference, The Brain, Choice and Responsibility and Money.

BBC Bitesize

Games, activities and resources for teachers and parents. 

Internet Matters

From age-specific online-safety checklists to guides on how to set parental controls on a range of devices, here there are a host of practical tips to help children get the most out of their digital world.

Childnet

Information and resources to help you support your child to have a happy and safe online experience.

Stop Bullying

Information about bullying: what it is and how to deal with and prevent it.

Places to Visit to support learning

 


Kidzania in London is a great place to take pupils who want to get a realistic glimpse into the life of adults, including work and careers. The attraction has everything from fake supermarket checkouts to a vets to a pit-stop challenge for children to get hands-on with real activities which could spark an interest in a future career. Not only this, but it helps motivate pupils to work together as a team and build confidence.

Science Museum With Relationships and Health Education now statutory in primary education and Sex Education being an integral part of our PSHE curriculum, the Science Museum can provide a good starting point for thinking more about the human body and how it works.

Teaching children about money and how the economy works might sound intimidating but there are plenty of ways to support teaching this difficult subject. Although economics might be more of Secondary subject, getting pupils involved from a young age can be beneficial. A trip to the Bank of England Museum is a good idea for getting pupils engaged in money and they can learn about the history of it as well as its worth within the economy. It also offer resources for school visits to help groups understand the role of the bank itself.

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